Drive Belts

All types of drive belts supplied: V, flat, round (leather & plastic), link, variable-speed, poly-V, etc.

For immediate delivery or straightforward advice about any belt (no order too small) feel free to call us.

We also stock miniature V-belts (6 & 8mm top widths) and the special belts for: Axminster 918, Warco 918 (and similar developed copies of the Emco Compact 8), Naerok and Seeley bandsaws, etc.
Belts also stocked or made for a variety of popular Lathes & Millers: Myford, Boxford, Emco, Unimat, Axminster, Warco, Colchester, Harrison etc.

Advice on how to ensure that you order the correct length of flat belting can be found here.

Betalon Multiply Flat Belting

The ideal installation for any machine tool is an endless Betalon-Multiply belt; these are light in weight but immensely strong and stretch resistant. They absorb shock loads well, have a high coefficient of friction, enjoy a proven record of reliable industrial service and can be made in almost any combination of length and width.

Nu-T-Link V-Belt

This is the replacement for the original "Brammer" black-fabric "round-end" link-belting that was held together with mushroom-headed metal pins each (usually) stamped with a letter "B". The new belts have only a slight curve to the end of each link and the head of the pins are now "T" section.

Power Twist V-Belt

A new development of an old idea - a link belt without metal fasteners. This is highly effective on all lighter machine tools and especially useful on precision lathes and millers where a "softer" drive, free from vibration, is appropriate.

Round Leather Belting

Early lathes, light-duty milling machines, drills, Singer and other makes of sewing machine and assorted power tools were often driven by a round leather belt, sometimes referred to in contemporary literature as a "gut" drive. This type of belting is also used in furniture and similar products. It is still available and usually in stock for immediate delivery.

Please note: the stated diameter of the material is nominal i.e. the measurement might be a little under or over the given figure.